Links for the Week of 2009-01-16

SQL SERVER

Re-associate SQL Users with Logins Scott Koon put up this script a while ago (back in ’07), but I had cause to use it this week. When you restore a database from a backup taken on a different machine you’ll need to re-associate users with their logins. Easy. Done.

Scripting Server Permissions And Role Assignments Kendal Van Dyke shows how it’s possible to script out all permissions and roles assigned to the users of a specific database. Good things in case you’re regularly in the habit of nuking your database and rebuilding it.

DEVELOPMENT

Forcing a UI redraw from JavaScript Thomas Fuchs provides a script to force a page redraw (different from a refresh) using JavaScript. Given the different rendering engines in different browsers (I’m looking at you Safari), problems can rise up when you’re dynamically building page content. The only way to fix it is to force a repaint of the page. This is a good one to keep in your library, if you do web development.

Starting out with Objective-C Todd Ritter put together a list of great resources for people interested in learning Objective-C. It’s an expressive language and is on my list of languages to learn and play around with. Hopefully ’09 will be the year for it.

GENERAL

Amazon Web Services Explained Brent Ozar manages to explain Amazon Web Services in a way that makes sense to me. After reading this post I finally understand why I would use AWS apart from storing massive quantities of data that I never need to view again.

iBusiness Intelligence – Business Intelligence 2.0 with an i for Design Rob Paller talks about the Mint.com iPhone application and how their UI ideas should be applied to other forms of BI.

Apocalyptic Machine Scultpures are Wonderful in a Morbid, Sinister Sort of Way Like the people at gizmodo said, “Kris Kuksi probably had a disturbing childhood (or dropped acid in graveyards). But it doesn’t make his pieces any less awesome.” I am fascinated by art that’s built up from a combination of different imagery, there’s something compelling about Kris’s work. Enjoy.

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